Allied Fiber Completes Its Sixth Colocation Facility Along Florida’s East Coast

Allied Fiber has made significant progress with its fiber installation up the East Coast of Florida. This past week, the sixth and final colocation facility was placed in St. Augustine. Now, Allied Fiber has facilities in West Palm Beach, Fort Pierce, Rockledge, New Smyrna Beach, St. Augustine and Jacksonville.

The following are photographs from the St. Augustine colocation placement this past week, and the Jacksonville colocation facility that was placed the week of March 17th.

We will continue to update our blog with the status of the build-out, so check back regularly for the most up-to-date Allied Fiber news.

Interested in a career at Allied Fiber? View our open positions and submit your resume at this link.

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ALLIED FIBER COMPLETES FIBER JETTING FROM MIAMI TO JACKSONVILLE

This past week, Allied Fiber completed the jetting of the fiber backbone from the NAP of the Americas in Miami to the end of the FEC duct system in the Jacksonville rail yard – a total of 1,868,267 feet (354 miles). This is a huge milestone for Allied Fiber in our build-out of Florida’s east coast and the first leg of our southeast segment!

In addition to completing the jetting, Allied Fiber has also been able to review the test results for the Miami — West Palm Beach – Ft. Pierce segments.  The results indicate a .18 to .19 dB loss per km, resulting in a 60 mile (100 km) span loss of only 18 to 19 dB. These exceptional results have been communicated to and well received by Allied Fiber’s customers.

Allied Fiber has also completed the foundation and placement of the modular colocation facility at New Smyrna Beach, FL. This is the third Allied Fiber colocation facility to be installed in Florida.

Allied Fiber is in the process of engaging with several equipment manufacturers that are preparing to start installations and demonstrations of their equipment in a “live trial” environment on the route. This will give all network operators the opportunity to “try before you buy” the latest and greatest 100G and 400G DWDM systems available on the market today.

If there are any vendors, or network operators not currently involved in the Allied Fiber “live trial” and are interested please contact us directly to be included. Info@alliedfiber.com

 

We will continue to update our blog with the status of the build-out, so check back regularly for the most up-to-date Allied Fiber news.

Interested in a career at Allied Fiber? View our open positions and submit your resume at this link.

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Allied Fiber is off to a great start in the New Year, with continued fiber and colocation facility installation progress up the Florida east coast. In just the first half of this month, Allied Fiber has installed 142,350 feet (27 miles) of cable, bringing the project all the way into St. Johns, FL.  The total cable installed between Miami and Jacksonville is now 1,829,507 feet (346 miles).

This week, Allied Fiber also completed the finishing touches on its second colocation facility located in Fort Pierce, FL.

The following are photographs of the completion work at the Ft. Pierce colocation facility.

We will continue to update our blog with the status of the build-out, so check back regularly for the most up-to-date Allied Fiber news.

Interested in a career at Allied Fiber? View our open positions and submit your resume at this link.

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Allied Fiber has steadily continued to progress with its fiber installation up the east coast of Florida. So far the company has completed over 293 route miles between Miami and Jacksonville.  This week, Allied Fiber completed the installation of 114,516 feet of cable (21.7 miles) which is now the highest number of feet of cable installed by Allied Fiber in a single week. Fiber installation is now complete from Miami, FL through Bunnell, FL.

Also, on December 5th Allied Fiber completed the installation of its second colocation facility in Florida located in Ft. Pierce, FL

The following are photographs of the Ft. Pierce colocation facility installation as well as the fiber jetting in Bunnell, FL:

We will continue to update our blog with the status of the build-out, so check back regularly for the most up-to-date Allied Fiber news.

Interested in a career at Allied Fiber? View our open positions and submit your resume at this link.

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Allied Fiber has continued to rapidly progress with its fiber installation up the Florida East Coast completing over 267 route miles so far between Miami and Jacksonville.  Over the past two weeks, Allied Fiber completed the installation of 184,714 feet of cable (35 miles), taking the project through Port Orange, FL and Daytona Beach, FL, and ending in Ormond Beach, FL.

Allied Fiber also completed the construction and installation of the West Palm Beach colo facility in preparation for its November 13, 2013 launch event. Nearly 100 people gathered for the event, which included a tour of the West Palm Beach facility and a luncheon at the Phillips Point Club in West Palm Beach, FL. Click here to view a slideshow of pictures taken during the launch event.

The following are pictures of the installation of the West Palm Beach colo facility:

We will continue to update our blog on the status of this development, so check back regularly for the most up to date Allied Fiber news.

Interested in a career at Allied Fiber? View our open positions and submit your resume at this link.

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Allied Fiber has continued to rapidly place fiber up Florida’s East Coast completing over 215 route miles so far between Miami and Jacksonville. This week, Allied Fiber completed the installation of 98,160 feet (19 miles) of cable , ending in Titusville, FL.

Allied Fiber has also shipped the West Palm Beach colo facility from Louisiana, which is now in transit to Florida (see images below). The colo was separated into three sections for shipping and will be re-assembled when it arrives at the West Palm Beach colo site.

During the colo shipment process, construction has steadily advanced in West Palm Beach to complete the foundation for the installation of the colo early next week. (See images of the foundation work below).

We will continue to update our blog on the status of this development, so check back regularly for the most up to date Allied Fiber news.

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One Million Feet and Counting!

Allied Fiber  has continued its progress up Florida’s East Coast surpassing one million feet of cable installed in the Miami to Jacksonville route this past week.

Construction productivity for the week also hit an all time high with 104,719 feet of cable (20.0 miles) installed during the week.  This brings the total footage installed to 1,037,339 (196.5 miles).  Allied Fiber has now completed the route from Miami, FL through Melbourne, FL and Rockledge, FL, ending in Cocoa, FL.

Allied Fiber has also completed fabrication of the West Palm Beach colo and is working on final acceptance testing before shipping to Florida next week.  The colo will be separated into three sections for shipping and re-assembled in West Palm Beach, FL.

The following are photos of the colo being tested and prepared for shipping:

We will continue to update our blog on the status of this development, so check back regularly for the most up to date Allied Fiber news.

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Allied Fiber’s network construction has continued to progress up Florida’s East Coast from Miami to Jacksonville.  Last week, Allied Fiber completed the installation of 88,162 feet of cable (16.7 miles) – by far the largest amount of cable installed in a single week so far.  In addition, 2,640 fusion splices were completed last week, also the largest number of splices completed in a week.  With last week’s installation, Allied Fiber has now completed the route from Miami thru Sebastian, FL and Grant, FL ending in Malabar, FL.

Allied Fiber has also been working to finalize the electrical equipment installations in the West Palm Beach colo facility as it is being readied for shipment from Louisiana to Florida next week.  The Allied Fiber colocation facilities’ power systems are designed and engineered for a 3Ø 208V 600A main supporting protected AC and DC customer power feeds.

The following pictures show some of the final electrical installation work underway:

We will continue to update our blog on the status of this development, so check back regularly for the most up to date Allied Fiber news.

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Allied Fiber has continued to progress rapidly up Florida’s East Coast jetting fiber from Miami to Jacksonville.  Last week, 65,976 feet of cable with 528 fiber strands was installed between Lakewood Park and Winter Beach.  Allied Fiber also completed 1,056 fusion splices along the route.  This brings the total install in this route to 148 miles so far.

Representatives from Allied Fiber were onsite in Vero Beach this week to observe the fiber jetting and progress at the colo construction sites.  The following pictures were taken during the site visit:

Allied Fiber has also made steady progress on the fabrication of the West Palm Beach colo facility. The following are pictures of the electrical gear installations underway in the colo:

We will continue to update our blog on the status of this development, so check back regularly for the most up to date Allied Fiber news.

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Allied Fiber has continued to make steady progress jetting fiber up Florida’s East Coast from Miami to Jacksonville.  Last week, 64,572 feet of cable with 528 fiber strands was installed through Ft. Pierce en route to Vero Beach.  Allied Fiber also completed 1,056 fusion splices and installed 3 new handholes along the route.  This brings the total install in this route to 126 miles so far.

Representatives from Allied Fiber completed a walkthrough in Louisiana of the first colocation facility being fabricated for West Palm Beach. Over the next week, electrical and mechanical systems installations will be completed in preparation for shipping to Florida.

The following are pictures taken during the walkthrough of the pre-cast concrete structures before the electrical installation work began:

We will continue to update our blog on the status of this development, so check back regularly for the most up to date Allied Fiber news.

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Allied Fiber’s  fiber jetting in the Southeast route between Miami and Jacksonville has continued to steadily progress up the Florida East Coast. Last week, 66,652 feet of cable with 528 fiber strands was installed between Jupiter and Ft. Pierce. There were also 1,056 new fusion splices completed along the route. This brings the total install in this route to 114 miles so far.

The first colocation facility being fabricated in Louisiana for the West Palm Beach site is also well underway and starting to take shape. Allied Fiber will be doing factory inspections of the colocation later this week and expects to ship the unit to Florida late next week.

The colocation structures are made of reinforced pre-cast concrete and are formed in sections that will be assembled on-site much like a giant Lego set.

The following are pictures of several of the pre-cast sections cast over the last few days:

We will continue to update our blog on the status of this development, so check back regularly for the most up to date Allied Fiber news.

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Allied Fiber has continued its steady progress on the Miami to Jacksonville build.  Last week, 66,550 feet of cable with 528 fiber strands was installed between Port Sewall and Jupiter.  There were also 528 new fusion splices completed along the route.  This brings the total install in this route to 102 miles so far.

We will continue to update our blog on the status of this development, so check back regularly for the most up to date Allied Fiber news.

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Allied Fiber has continued its steady progress on the Miami to Jacksonville build.  Last week, 67,200 feet of cable with 528 fiber strands was installed between Jupiter and Hobie Sound.  There were also 2,112 fusion splices completed along the route.  This brings the total install in this route to 89 miles so far. 

Pre-fabrication construction of the first colocation facility is almost complete at the manufacturer’s site in Louisiana.  Electrical conduit and mechanical gear installations will continue this week in preparation for an early September ship / install at West Palm Beach.  Once the first unit ships, fabrication will immediately begin on the Ft. Pierce and Rockledge facilities.

We will continue to update our blog on the status of this development, so check back regularly for the most up to date Allied Fiber news.

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Allied Fiber has made steady progress on the Miami to Jacksonville build.  Last week, 49,184 feet of cable with 528 fiber strands was installed and 1,056 fusion splices were completed.  This brings the total install in this route to 76 miles at this point.

On the colocation facility construction side, preparations are underway at each of the 6 Florida sites (West Palm Beach, Ft. Pierce, Rockledge, New Smyrna Beach, St. Augustine, and Jacksonville). With West Palm Beach being the first scheduled to be on the ground early September.  Pre-fabrication of the colocation facilities is taking place in Louisiana with AF personnel on site this week to begin the walkthroughs and electro / mechanical systems inspections.

We will continue to update our blog on the status of this development, so check back regularly for the most up to date Allied Fiber news.

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Julius Kamara, the project coordinator of the West African Regional Communications Programme has announced that despite recent delays, their strategic plan to implement fiber infrastructure is still on track for completion. To read the full article, click here.

This is yet another excellent example of the exact same patterns and process that is required to be followed in any country, state, or province to achieving proper network connectivity for the common benefits stated. Everywhere the challenges and rewards are the same. The most valuable assets, the submarine cable systems that link the continents, need an execution plan in and of themselves. Once in motion, the countries, states and provinces that they touch and their neighbors that touch them must all plot a course to interconnection. This is the basis of a proper fiber network infrastructure. The necessity to be connected is inherent for any land with people and machines that wish to participate in the world economy. This pattern applies globally and is only limited by politics, vested interests, access to capital, a solid plan and execution.

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Antel (Administracion Nacional de Telecomunicaciones) recognized the importance of FTTH (Fiber to the Home) and is implementing a systematic plan to better connect homes throughout Uruguay.

Examples such as this prove that everyone needs fiber to achieve higher networking speeds and reliability to expand opportunities. Every country should strive for a dense fiber infrastructure that connects to towers, businesses, towns, homes, etc.

Most people in the United States (living in somewhat connected regions) do not realize that our country is home to several “remote” areas that are unserved by fiber-based networks. The quality of access in these areas is so minimal that you would be better served trying to connect to a network in the middle of a dense jungle in some foreign land.

Even in the faraway town of Colonia, Uruguay there are now better connections than some regions in the United States. This proves that when it comes to fiber, the third world is right here in the United States.

The fiber infrastructure in this country is a significant issue that gets far too little attention. If the U.S. does not implement a systematic plan, similar to Antel’s plan we will continue to fall farther behind as the rest of the world advances its fiber infrastructure and thus its connection speeds and reliability.

For the full article, click here.

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Construction for the Miami-Jacksonville-Atlanta segment of Allied Fiber’s Southeastern route is underway. Allied Fiber is currently jetting up to 340 feet of fiber per minute (5.6 miles of fiber per day). The Miami to West Palm Beach segment is expected to be completed during the first week of August 2013. The Miami-Jacksonville-Atlanta build is anticipated to take 6 to 9 months to complete.

Figure Eight Cable in Lantana

Allied Fiber’s Southeastern route marks the first network-neutral, fully integrated, nationwide dark fiber and colocation system in the United States.

In early April, Allied Fiber and Corning Fiber Systems agreed to terms allowing Allied Fiber to issue a purchase order for a custom-built 528 count fiber cable, which was an integral element in making the Miami-Jacksonville-Atlanta build a reality.

For additional information regarding the Miami-Jacksonville-Atlanta portion of Allied Fiber’s Southeastern route, please click here.

Allied Fiber Construction Photos July 2013

The following gallery of images were taken during the fiber construction/cable jetting at Lantana.

Excavation near Lantana

Figure Excavation in Lantana

First Manhole in Lantana

 

Rope Cutting in Lantana

Backlifting in Lantana

Fiber reel staging

 

Opening manhole to jet

Jetting the cable at 260+ feet per minute

Adding lube to jetting

 

Pulling cable from the reel and into jetting machine

Jetting machine setup

Jetting machine setup

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AGL Magazine posted an article on  former U.S. chief technology officer to the Obama administration, Aneesh Chopra’s recent speech at  the Virginia Wireless Association’s 4G 4VA? wireless seminar. The speech discussed how it is necessary for the tower industry to enter into public/private partnerships to help keep FirstNet within its budgetary constraint. Both the speech and article give light to more clues on FirstNet for public safety and commercial use.

For the full article, click here http://agl-mag.com/tower-owners-can-play-role-in-firstnet/.

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A recent article on BuySellBandwidth titled ‘Countries Most Vulnerable to an Internet Shutdown‘ examines Forbes’ research on this topic.

Allied Fiber understands the current risks, vulnerabilities and present danger to the US terrestrial fiber systems and carrier hotels. Achieving maximum, realistic, physical diversity is one of the primary drivers of the Allied Fiber system for these reasons.

For the complete article, visit the following link:
http://blog.buysellbandwidth.com/countries-most-vulnerable-for-an-internet-shutdown/

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America’s Need for a Real Fiber Plan

On December 17th, 2012, posted in: Uncategorized by

America Needs a Real Fiber Plan

Allied Fiber has said this repeatedly, but don’t take it from us. Susan Crawford says so – and she would know!

Click here for Susan’s full article:
http://www.wired.com/opinion/2012/12/hey-dont-forget-about-internet-access-in-the-u-s/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+wired%2Findex+%28Wired%3A+Top+Stories%29

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Allied Fiber on the Bandwidth Race

On December 17th, 2012, posted in: Uncategorized by

A recent column on Wired looked at the Bandwidth Race and Allied Fiber agrees with author Susan Crawford’s take. Spot-on Susan!
For the full article, click here:
http://www.wired.com/opinion/2012/10/bandwidth-race-plan/

Allied Fiber understands and agrees with these issues that the United States faces – and we are doing something about it!

The first step is to educate the masses about the reality. Ignorance is our greatest enemy. Beyond enlightenment is where the Plan is executed.

Keep on going Susan!

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A recent Telegeography news report entitled, “Switch it off, switch it on again: internet ‘restored’ in Syria” highlights the role that physical infrastructure plays in the Internet and all networks. It is the central component. Without it, there is no Internet and apparently no revolution.

The vulnerability of total loss, whether by nature, or man-made occurrence, is real and the results can be catastrophic on many levels potentially even determining the future of a country.

To read the full article, click here:
http://telegeography.us6.list-manage.com/track/click?u=12fee32cf02fafeb49f521d2f&id=ef54ce432f&e=7ebe53f311

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Submarine Cable Wars

On September 24th, 2012, posted in: Uncategorized by

It is more than just worth noting, it is alarming how the subsea cable community can be so well aware and organized as to avoid specific places due to political unrest, geological issues, network congestion and avoidance of outright surveillance and data interception. Nothing brings the reality of these actions to light more than this article.

Light Reading
Avoiding Egypt: Where Cables Fear to Dredge
http://www.lightreading.com/document.asp?doc_id=225138

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The 1st Inning of IP Networking

On September 17th, 2012, posted in: Uncategorized by

Peering is local. It always will be. The world is literally in the 1st inning of IP networking. For thise that don’t know, the Allied Fiber model drives the ability to provide peering/caching further down in to smaller markets which has inherent, proven benefits.

Just as Africa has cut out routing through the USA and now goes through Europe it will one day keep its local traffic local, but only after the infrastructure has been built to support it.

The following article by Bill St. Arnaud explores this further.

“Up to 98% of Internet traffic now consists of content that can be cached locally on servers”

[It is interesting to see this report from Analysys Mason that
confirms my analysis several years ago that most Internet traffic is
moving to the edge delivered by Content Distribution Networks (CDN)
delivered at Internet Exchange Points (IXPs) around the world. “In a
paper released yesterday, UK analyst firm Analysys Mason estimates
that 98 percent of internet traffic now consists of content that can
be stored on servers, such as streaming video or web pages. These
servers can be located in multiple locations around the world, and
then delivered to users faster and at lower cost. The result is a
shift in usage patterns and global Internet traffic flows. This
combined with deeper penetration of IXPs and caching means that the
way traffic flows across networks is changing too. The paper was
written to persuade governments that the proposed ITU regulatory
changes would hinder the growth of the web, but the report is well
worth reading as a way of understanding how the web has changed over
time. For example, 70% of international Internet bandwidth originating
in Africa went to the USA in 1999, but by 2011 this figure had plunged
to less than 5% as bandwidth shifted to Europe. Now, content is
increasingly being stored on servers in Africa, where it can be
accessed domestically or regionally.”

“Applying unwarranted static voice regulations to the dynamic
Internet would negatively impact users across the globe and slow or
reverse current growth trends. Furthermore, the rate regime system
would be difficult to design and expensive to implement, and even then
would increase the cost of content delivery and hinder network
investment at the expense of end users.”

It is not only CDNs but commercial clouds and social software
services like Facebook, Twitter, etc are part of this evolution. This
evolution in Internet traffic will have a major impact on Internet
architectures, addressing and naming. Please see
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1krqtbcQRdo0n_bjyJO8TT3ygUQMyd2nJBKWQmGT5hXw/edit
for more details. Research and Education networks can play a critical
role in developing open standards for CDN networks to distribute
research, education and public broadcast TV and radio. Please see my
previous blog on this subject
http://billstarnaud.blogspot.ca/2012/06/why-cdns-are-critical-to-future-of-r.html

For example At the last NANOG (North American Network Operators
Group) meeting in Vancouver CBC engineers gave a great presentation on
how they use Akamai and other CDNs (Content Distribution Networks) to
deliver CBC TV and Radio content over the Internet in Canada and
around the world.

This type of delivery of CBC broadcast content is called OTT (Over
The Top) is the same technique used by Netflix. OTT is critically
important in Canada, especially for Canadian broadcast content and
cultural material as we continue to see media consolidation in Canada
(re Bell takeover of Astral media). The larger commercial telcos and
cablecos hate OTT, have little interest in supporting Canadian
broadcast content, other than that they are required to carry by
regulation. When we eventually relax our foreign ownership
restrictions on telecom and cable, there will be greater push by
telcos and cablecos to be relieved of all Canadian content
restrictions. OTT may be the only way we can insure that a Canadian
voice will be heard in the future multi-media cacophony of competing
services delivered over the Internet.

IXPs as being developed by the Canadian Internet Registration
Authority (CIRA) and a number of regional networks will be critical
for delivering Canadian content OTT via CIRA’s integrated of Akamai
with the IXP. Smaller ISPs and community networks who have a vested
interested in promoting Canadian values and content need to
distinguish themselves from the oligopolistic telcos and cablecos .
CIRA’s leadership in deploying IXPs across Canada employing Akamai
CDN will be critical for the survival of those smaller ISPs and who
believe OTT is the future of delivery of broadcast content.

Gigacom on Analysys Mason Report

http://gigaom.com/2012/09/13/the-shape-of-the-internet-has-changed-it-now-lives-life-on-the-edge/?utm_source=social&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=gigaom

100 Terabytes a Day: How CBC Delivers Content to Canadians

How does Canada’s Public broadcaster deliver content to millions of
users a day as efficiently as possible?

This talk will touch upon the technologies, systems, and policies
used at CBC to deliver high quality streaming audio, video, and web
content as quickly and cheaply as possible to Canadians:

- Using CDNs to bring the content as close as possible to end users

- The nature of “news” generated network traffic and how to prepare
for it.

- Why peering with CBC directly (or any news organization) might be a
bad idea.

- Front End Optimizations (FEO) that are done to ensure minimal
traffic/bw usage between end users and the origin.

- Caching and how to best take advantage of it.

This talk will give attendees a look at how a large news organization
manages and deals with unpredictable network traffic at the
application level.

http://www.nanog.org/meetings/nanog55/presentations/Monday/Crosby.pdf

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http://www.telegeography.com/products/commsupdate/articles/2012/08/06/next-phase-in-deployment-of-fibre-optic-links-expected-soon

It should come as no surprise to anyone in the world that practically everyone in the world wants and needs faster connectivity. Most people outside of Zimbabwe might not know, or care about what is going on there, but it is quite telling. As remote and disconnected to some as this country may seem there exists a clear vision and path to an interconnected future. The basic elements are in place and now begins the path to execution.

For all of those too busy, or too smart to care to notice, there are many places just as remote and disconnected right here in the USA. If your response is, “Well, that’s why I don’t live there”, consider that those Americans contribute to the GDP of the country and a stronger US economy means your life wherever you do live improves as theirs does. A logical and methodical investment in fiber to enable global connectivity is the way forward for everyone. Just ask Zimbabwe.

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Definition Makes All the Difference

On July 23rd, 2012, posted in: Uncategorized by

This is the perfect example of how in this industry everyone uses the same words and terms, but also have different definitions for them.

http://www.telegeography.com/products/commsupdate/articles/2012/07/23/t-mobile-usa-discontinues-americas-largest-4g-network-tagline/

Apparently some carriers intentionally use words and terms very loosely purely for marketing reasons.

Other words, like Broadband, are poorly defined in the public marketplace, but get very specifically defined in State legislatures by incumbent carriers as a very low-speed, copper-based service to protect the incumbent’s interests and, or as something that is “illegal” for certain entities, such as municipalities, to provide themselves.

Fiber is such a word. It has no single meaning, or definition when referenced in the context of a product, or service provided by a carrier. The word fiber could mean dark, lit, or managed and it says nothing of the age, type, count, access points, cost of the fiber, or if it is aerial, or underground. These are the critical details that make all of the difference.

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Look around the US and it is unfortunately easy to find unhappy people that are not satisfied with their current situations. Wireless service is on that list. Sadly, although everyone seeks better options, there do not happen to be any at the moment. A clear plan to “create” options, which by the way also creates jobs, creates productivity and creates GDP growth, is in high demand.

Read on for an excerpt from the report.
More Than 50 Percent of Consumers Are Unhappy With Their
Wireless Provider in New Study From U.S. Cellular

U.S. Cellular Launches New Campaign to Help Those in
Dysfunctional Wireless Relationships

CHICAGO, July 17, 2012 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — A study announced today by
U.S. Cellular (NYSE:USM) indicates that 43 percent of individuals are
in the “seven year itch” phase with their wireless provider, noting
they are comfortable but suspect they are missing out on something
better. Out of the 1,208 participants polled across four regions of the
country, 56 percent of the respondents admitted to being unhappy with
their carrier over the past year but only 35 percent of all respondents
have ever broken up with their provider. In spite of this overall
dissatisfaction, respondents are hesitant to call it quits. It’s no
secret that people are frustrated with their wireless experience, but
people tolerate less because they don’t believe there is a better
option. More than one-third (37 percent) of respondents say they stick
with their current provider because they believe all carriers are the
same, it is too much trouble to switch carriers, or they don’t want to
sign a new contract.

For the complete report, visit the following link, http://www.uscellular.com/about/press-room/2012/MORE-THAN-50-PERCENT-OF-CONSUMERS-ARE-UNHAPPY-WITH-THEIR-WIRELESS-PROVIDER-IN-NEW-STUDY-FROM-USCELLULAR.html.

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A Need for Fiber Everywhere

On March 22nd, 2012, posted in: Uncategorized by

There is no fiber glut and those that ignore reality will find themselves on the outside looking in to the rest of the world that has made the proper plans and investment.

Every element of the fiber network globally needs a proper plan and investment. It is not just one country, or another – aside from those that already have a plan underway. It is not wireless verses wired, it is not just FTTP, FTTT, or fiber to the data center. It is a need for fiber everywhere.

Wired’s recent article ‘UK plans for superfast broadband neither super nor fast’ takes a look at the fiber need further. Here is the link to the complete story: http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2012-03/22/uk-superfast-broadband-is-neither-super-nor-fast

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Spectrum in America

On February 22nd, 2012, posted in: Uncategorized by

This recent article from CNN Money is very curious. http://money.cnn.com/2012/02/21/technology/spectrum_crunch/

The issue with spectrum is that it has been misallocated and is therefore being inefficiently utilized. Yes, it is finite, but that is all the more reason to treat it carefully.

The thought that this somehow sunk up on us, has taken America by surprise and that no one anticipated it may be partially true, but is a “Chicken Little”, “sky is falling” attitude. With proper planning it can be managed.

What is ironic is that there is concept held by some of a fiber glut in the USA, but at the same time there is a wireless spectrum exhaust. Neither are accurate statements.

In reality there is plenty of spectrum, it is just being misused, and there is actually a scarcity of dark fiber available for lease by any and all network operators – including wireless carriers. Unlike spectrum, dark fiber cannot be created just by signing a license agreement, as it is for the airwaves. Spectrum is a Right of Way in the air just as a duct is in dirt Right of Way.

Wireless in the mobile device definition is obviously very convenient and desirable, but it requires fiber for backhaul in order for it to work. So again, the irony is that the article never mentions the need for fiber beyond getting the spectrum issue sorted out which is odd because if a national fiber plan for Fiber to the Tower existed it too would easy the pain of spectrum exhaust by making the spectrum more locally efficient. With more wireless access points fed by fiber there are less mobile users vying for airwave capacity on a long distance basis letting the fiber do that work.

The bottom line is that we need a real, national plan for spectrum as well as dark fiber and physical layer interconnection and colocation in order for the USA to effectively manage demand and its disparate need to add jobs, grow productivity and GDP to be competitive on the global stage. One without the other is not going to produce the results.

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Takeaways from DOJ Antitrust Lawsuit

On September 1st, 2011, posted in: Uncategorized by

Cowen Group had a conference call to review the DOJ Antitrust Lawsuit against AT&T with Telecom lawyer, Andy Lipman of Bingham McCutchen. Below is the overview of this call as well as feedback from Hunter Newby, CEO of Allied Fiber.

Takeaways from DOJ Antitrust Lawsuit Review Call

Conclusion. Yesterday, we hosted a conference call with Andy Lipman who heads the telecom practice and Frank Lamancusa who specializes in enforcement at the law firm Bingham McCutchen. The purpose of the call was to discuss the announcement by the Department of Justice (DOJ) that it has decided to file an antitrust lawsuit to block AT&T’s proposed acquisition of T-Mobile USA (Tmo). The DOJ stated that it was concerned that approving the transaction would reduce competition resulting in higher prices, poorer quality services, and fewer choices/innovative products for consumers. Our key takeaways from the call are summarized below. While we continue to believe the fundamental outlook for standalone AT&T is improving and that its 6.2% dividend yield is highly attractive, we believe continued uncertainty surrounding the deal including potentially having to pay Tmo a sizable break-up fee (see below) will continue to weigh on the stock. Maintain Neutral rating.

Unlikely that lawsuit is being used as a bargaining chip. While some may view the lawsuit by the DOJ as a bargaining chip, Mr. Lipman believes this is unlikely for several reasons including 1) the DOJ is seeking a permanent injunction as opposed to a preliminary injunction, 2) the team that the DOJ has assembled to preside over the case includes top litigators as well as a trial specialist, and 3) in his opinion the complaint filed was well drafted, implying that the decision was well thought out. While AT&T has stated that it expects divestitures and has agreed that the $39B deal price would not change if divestitures were below $3.9B, and could not walk away if divestures were below $7.8B, it appears the DOJ did not feel divestures alone would be enough to maintain a competitive environment noting in the complaint that the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI) suggests that 96 of the top 100 markets were overly concentrated and in 15 markets the combined company would have >50% market share.

It is more economical for AT&T to fight than to walk away. AT&T released a statement noting that it was surprised by the lawsuit and that it plans to ask for an expedited hearing and that the company intends to contest the matter in court. While Mr. Lipman noted that AT&T has not been formally served and has 21 days to respond he believes it will try to meet with the judge over the next several days. Considering the large break-up fee associated with the transaction which we estimate in total to be ~$6B we are not at all surprised that AT&T has chosen to go to trial. Recall, the break fee includes three parts including 1) AT&T would pay Deutsche Telekom $3B, 2) AT&T would transfer highly valuable AWS spectrum to Tmo that covers 110 markets, including 17 of the top 30, and 3) AT&T would sign an attractively priced wholesale 3G roaming contract with Tmo giving them coverage outside their current ~220 POPs.

A decision could still come in 1H12. While Mr. Lipman stated that the government has historically won the majority of cases that have gone to trial, he also referenced the Oracle/PeopeSoft (2005) and Whole Foods/Wild Oats (2007) mergers that ended up in court but were eventually approved. He believes that the trial will likely take an extensive amount of time especially when considering the amount of economic issues that will be heavily debated such as how to look at competition on either a local (AT&T) or national (DOJ) basis as well as how many providers are needed for a market to be considered competitive. Mr. Lipman also views the Oracle case which lasted about seven months from complaint filing to court decision as a decent estimate as to how long the trial could take. This would imply that the merger could still hypothetically be approved in 1H12, which would still be in-line with AT&T’s original time frame.

FCC is likely to reach same decision as DOJ. Yesterday, FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski released a statement noting that his agency also has serious concerns about the impact that the proposed transaction would have on competition although he also pointed out that the agency’s process is not complete. Mr. Lipman believes that the FCC was only recently made aware of the lawsuit. Mr. Lipman and Mr. Lamancusa also pointed out that while the DOJ largely focuses on whether or not competition would be harmed when deciding to approve a transaction the FCC is more open to negotiations since they look at variables beyond competition such as efficiencies created through the deal, public safety and broadband build-outs. That said Mr. Lipman believes that while the FCC may simply be at a different point it is likely that they are on the same path as the DOJ. We would point out that the FCC has always come to the same decision as the DOJ.

Hunter Newby Feedback: I have serious concerns about the impact that the litigation will have on infrastructure investment for 4G wireless in the USA, both the timing and scale of it.

I suppose it comes down to the same question, “How long is it supposed to take to do something right?”

The DOJ (and FCC) clearly sees the monopoly/control issue, but must balance that with the need for investment in a real 4G LTE network.

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In South Africa there is FiberCo. They “get it” and are making it happen. Now BT wants in.

http://www.telegeography.com/products/commsupdate/articles/2011/07/28/bt-global-poised-to-link-up-with-sa-fibre-project

Open-access long haul fiber makes sense.

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France –  ARCEP Asked to Step in as Fibre Disputes Escalate

http://www.telegeography.com/products/commsupdate/articles/2011/06/08/arcep-asked-to-step-in-as-fibre-disputes-escalate

It’s all about control. The control of fiber. The control of quality. The control of the underlying economics of “broadband” which in any segment if you have enough lit capacity you must control the fiber, or else you don’t have a business.

This applies in any country in the world. The larger the country, the more critical physical access is.

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This is the new model, the logical and necessary approach to data center development and deployment. It is one that legacy brick and mortar designs and models do not and cannot have.

In addition, the need for distributed cloud computing is driving the need for distributed data centers for which this is perfectly suited – as long as there is direct access to power and dark fiber.

For more information on this topic, please see Data Center Knowledge’s recent article on Modular Data Center demand. http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/archives/2011/05/13/citing-modular-demand-io-continues-expansion/

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If you connect this article to the Allied Fiber Container/Modular Data Center cartoon it is easy to see that these modular design sites can be shuttled along the Allied Fiber route to wherever the conditions are perfect for any application (inexpensive power, availability of power, tax incentives, state incentives, rebates, job creation, diversity, video distribution, mobile data distribution, peering, low latency, etc.). The power of modular data centers is unleashed through intermediate access to a flexible Nationwide dark fiber system. The combination of the two is unbeatable.

For the complete Data Center Boom article, click here.

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For those that do not believe there is a real, immediate need for new dark fiber investment in every segment of the “global network” take a look at the latest news from TeleGeography in the link below.

The reality is well beyond the investment thesis for new fiber and now has reached a level for those “in the know” that their entire country’s economy is tied to the connectivity thus in addition to new fiber there are now new laws protecting that fiber.

The rest of the world can, should and hopefully will follow the lead of Uruguay.

Uruguay
Submarine cable risk from vessels given ‘das boot’ by new regs

http://www.telegeography.com/cu/article.php?article_id=36752&email=text

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The Heartland Institute’s article titled “AT&T Acquisition of T-Mobile Seen As Boon for Customers, Competitors” by Phil Britt included comments I provided on the topic. This article can be found at the following link, http://www.heartland.org/full/29637/ATT_Acquisition_of_TMobile_Boon_for_Customers_and_Competitors.html Below is some additional feedback on AT&T’s acquisition of T-Mobile and the impact it will have on the United States.

I believe the AT&T/T-Mobile deal is good for the USA and good for consumers in the medium-long term.

Many individuals are focusing on the immediate impact of consumer mobile service. They are shortsighted. Yes, there will be one less choice for service (for now) which may lead to higher prices, etc, but the real issue is the challenge of justifying the CAPEX/OPEX to grow a proper 4G network in the geography of the USA. This is what we really need as opposed to being stuck at 3G service, but having lots of inexpensive offerings from several providers. We can’t have it both ways today. There is a price to pay.

The fact is that DT wasn’t spending/going to spend the CAPEX necessary to get to 4G LTE across the entire USA. They have no justification for it. They really only have mobile in the USA. T-Systems uses Type II for backhaul and really only for PoP-to-PoP (60-1 Wilshire) and large enterprise customer tails. They have no other business lines here unlike AT&T which has FTTH, wireline, video, mobile, data centers, etc. Therefore for every dollar DT spent for mobile backhaul in the USA was 100% allocated to that purpose. AT&T can spend $1 and allocate funds for transport across many business units by combining purposes and bringing down the effective cost. Also, with one less provider there is less churn, so they have a better chance of keeping their 40% mobile market share and getting a ROI.

Why would AT&T spend the non-recurring cost’s (CAPEX) to get FTTT only to have T-Mobile piggyback on that and get Ethernet backhaul without the upfront spend? It would mean that AT&T’s costs are higher, margins are lower and they have enabled a competitor that has no real fiber investment in the USA to trade. AT&T is much less concerned with Verizon Wireless as they cut deals for reciprocal backhaul in the incumbent markets (ie. Verizon Wireless just awarded AT&T the wireless backhaul contract for a 50 mile radius around Atlanta).

The gift for American consumers is that with this near term control AT&T will be able to justify the CAPEX/OPEX increase in spending to get a proper 4G backhaul network in place. This is sort of like “Broadband Relief” in 2003 where the RBOC’s received protection for their FTTH investments which led to FiOS, U-verse, only that ATT doesn’t build its own FTTT, they usually have a transport provider build it and they lease Ethernet circuits. That’s the gift. Once the CAPEX is spent to bring FTTT it is there. As the fiber penetration increases it seeds the towers for future mobile operator entrants that will not have the same mountain to climb. They will be able to enter the USA with only needing capital for the leased lit (OPEX) and not the capital for the builds to the towers (CAPEX). This is a huge savings and what mobile operators in “fiber-developed” countries around the world enjoy today.

Inside this deal is the secret that no one knows, or is willing to talk about – the USA’s position in the world for broadband is driven by the size and population of the country (population density) and the cost to build, maintain and operate the network which are directly related.

This is actually the exact formula for how to determine why every other country is where they are on the OECD list. In larger, more populated countries there are fewer providers, higher prices, lower levels of service speed and lower penetration levels as a result of the ratio.

I believe this deal is a necessary step in getting the USA to where it needs to be in the world – at the top.

Hunter Newby, CEO, Allied Fiber

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Below is a link to an article from the online issue of the great AGL Magazine. It covers lightRadio, AlcatelLucent’s technology that is making waves with its form-factor design for the airwaves.

A section of the article…

“….lightRadio is somewhat of a DAS system implementation, seemingly protocol agnostic and connected by fiber back to the network smarts point.”

I like this point, “by fiber.” Reads like “buy fiber” to me, or “build fiber,” but for sure “access to fiber” is essential.

The point is that in order to get in to the fully meshed, fully redundant mobile cloud world there needs to be a very logical, systematic investment in real, physical infrastructure. These advances are a part of the natural evolutionary process that is always occurring.

The mention of fiber in a wireless context has been somewhat taboo – up until now. It seems as if the world is waking up to the reality that the two do and must co-exist in order for mobility to function properly end to end.

This is all good! Now let’s build something logical!

http://www.agl-mag.com/newsletter/AB_030211_Biby.htm

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According to an article in the New York Times, “In the United States, costs would come down if several companies shared the financial burden of putting fiber into the ground and then competed on the basis of services built on top of the shared assets. That would bring multiple competitors into the picture, pushing down prices.”

This is a good article comparing the USA to Hong Kong

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/06/business/06digi.html?_r=1&hpw

I know Niq Lai, CFO City Telecom. We sat on a panel together at an Oppenheimer conference last year.

http://www.telecomramblings.com/2010/08/oppenheimers-fiber-infrastructure-panel/

Population density is one part, but geography is the other. Proximity factors in to costs. That’s why HK can have a gig for $26. Everyone is jammed in there.

Population Size in Sq KM Population/sq km
USA 307,006,550 9,372,610 33
Hong Kong 7,003,700 1095 6396

That’s quite a difference. The USA is a “country” and it is compared to other countries of much smaller size therefore they have an advantage when it comes to a capital plan for fiber to everything and real broadband everywhere.

Maybe a better comparison to Hong Kong in the USA would be the cities of New York, Los Angeles and Chicago

Population Size in Sq KM Population/sq km
NYC 8,391,881 1214 6913
LA 3,831,868 1290 2970
Chicago 2,851,268 606 4705
Hong Kong 7,003,700 1095 6396

NYC looks to be the closest in population and size, but is there a provider like City Telecom / HKBN in New York offering 1 Gig for $26 per month? No.

It is difficult to imagine how 8 million Gigs would get on to the public Internet even if there were such a service and provider. The end user might have 1 Gig of “broadband access” from their home, but they certainly would not have 1 Gig of “Internet Access”.

The Internet is a collection of networks and all links, the ends plus the middle (core) must have the capacity to deliver the speed, or the entire thing does not operate at the same rate.

Once people figure this out rational, logical discussions can begin to occur.

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Dark Fiber Community

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